Bibliometrics / Scientometrics

Bibliometrics & Scientometrics are a set of methods designed to track citations between and among academic publications.

What is Bibliometrics and Scientometrics?

Bibliometrics and scientometrics are two closely related approaches to measuring scientific publications and science in general, respectively.  In practice, much of the work that falls under this header involves various types of citation analysis, which looks at how scholars cite one another in publications.  This data can show quite a bit about networks of scholars and scholarly communication, links between scholars, and the development of areas of knowledge over time.

Software tools for bibliometrics

There are three main sources of bibliometric data: Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar.  Each has certain advantages and limitations which may influence which source or combination of sources you decide to use in your bibliometric search.  In another section of this toolkit (http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/tidsr/kb/52/bibliometrics-example), sample bibliometrics are done using all three sources, which is a good practice, particularly in the case of resources with relatively small numbers of result

How do I increase the number of links to my site and/or the number of people who find my site?

After performing referrer analysis and inlink analysis, you may become interested in increasing the number of sites that link to yours. This will not only help people find your work through similar projects but may help increase your search ranking in Google (e.g., it will help your site come closer to the top of the search results). Increasing the number of sites that link to yours is firstly a matter of increasing the number of people who find your site. If more people know about you, more people will link to you.

Bibliometrics: Enhancing the ability to track a project's scholarly impacts

One of the difficulties in bibliometrics with regard to non-traditional scholarly outputs is that citation habits in many fields favour citing the original paper version of a document, even if the only version consulted was electronic.  This appears to be due to partly to ingrained suspicions of the reliability of electronic documents, but is also a rather natural reaction to the difficulty of dealing with links which no longer work.  Whereas the citation to the original document is stable, citations to URLs can be unstable over time.

Bibliometrics: Short bibliography

There are literally thousands of publications about how to do bibliometrics and how to interpret bibliometric data.  Just a few are included here that address some of the key issues of interest when trying the understand the impact of scholarly outputs such as websites and digitised collections.

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